Rules of Accelerated Learning, #2: Fluency over Knowledge

Dublin human statue accelerated learning fluency

Sometimes "doing" requires standing very still (CC Shadowgate)

This is part of an ongoing series on the fundamental rules or “patterns” of accelerated learning. Each rule is very contextual; these are not silver bullets or cure-alls.

Rule #2: FLUENCY

When you are pursuing accelerated learning, and know you will be judged by the level of your performance (not your knowledge)…

Even after much training, it can be disappointing how little you are able to do (or remember.)

  • A broad understanding of a topic takes a while.
  • Theoretical understanding doesn’t mean you can apply what you know in the real world.
  • People learn by doing; experience is the best teacher.
  • You don’t know whether you can do something until you’ve done it.
  • Hidden problems and questions emerge only once you’ve had the real-world experience.
  • Although there are diverse learning styles, all (or most) of these are accommodated in a real-world experience.
Therefore, prioritize doing over knowledge-about.
  • Do something, anything, rather than speculating on how you might do it.
  • Observe and make use of your experience as you experiment with doing your target skill.
  • Interact and collaborate with other learners who are focused on doing over knowledge.
By focusing on doing you will accumulate experience and insights into the skill. Discuss these with your fellow learners, and journal it for your own learning. This has produced new knowledge for you, but now it’s knowledge born of experience rather than hypothesizing or speculation. You will commit more mistakes and feel more awkward during these early learning stages; implement strategies like PRESSURE VALVE (i.e., “HOW FASCINATING!”) to accomodate this increased personal challenge.

One thought on “Rules of Accelerated Learning, #2: Fluency over Knowledge

  1. Pingback: Accelerated Story 2: Fluency « Story by the Throat!

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